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‘Successful’ Psychopathy in the General Population: An Analysis of Primary and Secondary Psychopathic traits

Walsh, Olivia (2021) ‘Successful’ Psychopathy in the General Population: An Analysis of Primary and Secondary Psychopathic traits. Undergraduate thesis, Dublin, National College of Ireland.

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Abstract

Psychopathy has traditionally been considered as a developmental ‘personality’ disorder, with psychopathic traits either indicating the presence or absence of the disorder. However, recent research is indicative of psychopathy as a continuum; psychopathic traits have been found in various populations and to varying degrees of severity. Research into corporate psychopathy has highlighted the implications of unbridled psychopathy in the workplace. This, coupled with research into the factors of psychopathy, has led to the introduction of the concept of ‘Successful’ vs ‘Unsuccessful’ psychopathy. ‘Successful’ psychopathy relates to the presence of psychopathic traits but the absence or avoidance of adverse consequences, while ‘unsuccessful’ psychopathy relates to the presence of psychopathic traits and obvious deviancies e.g.: incarceration. Corporate psychopathy research has furthered the concept of an individual with advantageous elements of psychopathy, allowing them to ascend societal hierarchies. This study utilized psychopathic, success and personality scales to attempt to gain insight into the predictive effects of both personality and ‘socially perceived success’ on the individual factors of psychopathy. Results support the previously proposed concepts of an ‘antagonistic interpersonal style’ relating to Factor 1, and a ‘negative emotionality’ relating to Factor 2, based on personality. The hypothesis that ‘socially perceived success’ was positively associated with primary psychopathy, while conversely being negatively associated with secondary psychopathy was not fully supported.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > Psychology
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry > Neurology. Diseases of the Nervous System. > Psychiatry > Psychopathology > Personality Disorders. Behaviour Problems.
Divisions: School of Business > BA (Honours) in Psychology
Depositing User: Clara Chan
Date Deposited: 14 Aug 2021 10:55
Last Modified: 16 Sep 2021 15:50
URI: http://norma.ncirl.ie/id/eprint/4973

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