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Investigating the Relationship Between Anxiety, Depression & Loneliness with Addictive Smartphone Behaviour Amongst Young Adults During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Boland, Rory (2021) Investigating the Relationship Between Anxiety, Depression & Loneliness with Addictive Smartphone Behaviour Amongst Young Adults During the COVID-19 Pandemic. Undergraduate thesis, Dublin, National College of Ireland.

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Abstract

Aims: Previous research documents smartphones’ relationship with mental health, but research is limited within an Irish context. Studies indicate a rise in smartphone use during COVID-19. Therefore, this study investigates the relationship between mental health and addictive smartphone behaviours during COVID-19, whilst exploring gender differences within addictive smartphone behaviours.

Method: Online surveys were administered via social media involving four questionnaires; The Depression, Anxiety & Stress Scale, The Smartphone Addiction Scale, The UCLA Loneliness Scale and The Coronavirus Anxiety Scale. 178 participants aged 18-30, with a mean age of 25.02 years (SD = 2.48) interacted with this study.

Results: There was a weak positive association between loneliness and addictive smartphone behaviours (r = .14, p >.001). Coronavirus-related anxiety had a moderate positive association with addictive smartphone behaviour (r = .46, p >.001). Generalized anxiety displayed a strong positive association with addictive smartphone behaviour (r =.69, p< .001). The most significant association was between depression and addictive smartphone behaviour (r =.72, p< .001). A multiple regression model explained 58% of variance in addictive smartphone behaviours. Depression, generalized anxiety and COVID-19 anxiety were uniquely predictive of addictive smartphone behaviours. A Mann-Whittney U test revealed females displayed significantly higher addictive smartphone behaviours (M = 108.14) than males (M = 75.61).

Conclusion: Findings suggest there is a relationship between forms of anxiety, depression and loneliness with addictive smartphone behaviours, and females may be most vulnerable. Interventional measures are advised for vulnerable populations. Future longitudinal approaches are recommended to assess negative effects that may last after COVID-19.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > Psychology
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry > Neurology. Diseases of the Nervous System. > Psychiatry > Psychopathology > Personality Disorders. Behaviour Problems. > Addiction
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > Psychology > Emotions
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA790 Mental Health
Divisions: School of Business > BA (Honours) in Psychology
Depositing User: Clara Chan
Date Deposited: 09 Aug 2021 17:53
Last Modified: 16 Sep 2021 13:21
URI: http://norma.ncirl.ie/id/eprint/4913

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